Relapsing MS: prompt intervention can help reduce damage in the CNS1

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative inflammatory disease that causes irreversible damage to the central nervous system (CNS). Usually, this damage is detected when symptoms appear, sometimes in the form of a relapse.1

Although relapsing MS is unpredictable with symptoms that may vary from one person to another in type and severity, there are 3 different common types of relapsing MS.2

Although relapsing MS is unpredictable from one person to another with symptoms that may vary in type and severity, there are 3 different common types of relapsing MS.2

Relapsing forms of MS: Clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS, active secondary progressive disease

Relapsing
forms of MS
include3:

Clinically
isolated
syndrome

Relapsing-
remitting MS

Active secondary
progressive
disease

Over time, repair mechanisms within the CNS are exhausted and unable to keep up with accumulating damage. This failure to keep up may impair communication across neural networks and contribute to increases in physical and cognitive disability in people with MS.1

Therefore, it is important to consider early intervention and continued treatment with disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), which may reduce the development of new areas of damage within the CNS, and reduce the frequency and severity of clinical attacks, which are thought to contribute to long-term disability.4

Fatigue is one of the most prevalent symptoms of MS